Films test

The Voice of Redwater

The Voice of Redwater is an artist film about the journey a stream makes from its source on a Pennine moor to its confluence with the Calder River. Five women set out to meet the stream and listen to its voice, and to them it reveals itself. ‘I am life. I am instinct. I am we, we collective, coming together in this instinctual, primeval knowing of finding movement.’ Redwater has much to say about its relationship to humans and speaks with a profundity that leaves a deep impression on the listeners.

Art Films

The Voice of Redwater is an artist film about the journey a stream makes from its source on a Pennine moor to its confluence with the Calder River. Five women set out to meet the stream and listen to its voice, and to them it reveals itself. ‘I am life. I am instinct. I am we, we collective, coming together in this instinctual, primeval knowing of finding movement.’ Redwater has much to say about its relationship to humans and speaks with a profundity that leaves a deep impression on the listeners.

An experiment in underwater photography, observing the changing body of a river through four seasons.
The filmmaker floats in a wet suit, suspended, weightless between two worlds.
Music: ‘Animals’ by James Etherington, sung by hortus vocalis and conducted by Markus Wettstein.”]

Selected for screening at the 2012 Greater Manchester Fringe Festival, also ‘Journeys and Migrations’ exhibition at Hand Made in Bradford, and shortlisted for the Aesthetica Short Film Festival in York. The filmmaker narrates a series of dreams with water themes, dreamt over the course of a year during which she went to New Zealand. The film captures how closely her dream world and the material world she explores run parallel, and sometimes interweave, reality becoming dream-like. Both worlds are imbued with mystery and a sense of omnipresent danger.
‘What I loved about your film was the collision of different levels. And especially how the dream narration wasn’t subordinate to the visual. They were equal. I think that in such juxtapositions we can bring forth the knowledge we need now.
But the thing I loved most about your film was your portrait of Sandy. You sort of say “look and listen and learn”, and I was greatly affected both by her and your looking at her, which also said a lot about you.’ Michael Turnbull

Artists Films

A documentation of the Tutus art intervention piece ‘Red Shoes’ from preparation to performance, and observing subsequent public interaction.

Christine Herbert talks about her work as an abstract artist.

“I am absolutely delighted with my video it was a pleasure to work with Clare, her professionalism and expertise transformed the hours of video footage and audiotape into a seamless whole. Throughout the process she remained aware of my aspirations and intentions for the finished piece and consulted with me throughout. I’ve had many comments about the quality of the production and it has been well worth the investment in a quality product.” Christine Herbert